Category

News

Category

The US and South Korea have now conducted a joint military exercise to respond to North Korea’s launch, firing their own missile into the South’s territorial waters.

North Korea announced on Tuesday that it had tested its first intercontinental ballistic missile — potentially its most powerful weapon yet, and one possibly capable of reaching the United States.

The announcement came hours after US and South Korean defense officials said North Korea had launched a missile from the country’s North Phyongan province that reached an altitude of 2,500 kilometers (1,500 miles) and was tracked for 37 minutes before it fell in the Sea of Japan.

“Respected Supreme Leader Kim Jong Un signed the order to carry out the test-fire of inter-continental ballistic rocket Hwasong-14 on July 3,” a statement from the Korean Central News Agency said.

US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson confirmed North Korea’s launch of the intercontinental ballistic missile in a statement Tuesday evening, saying the US “strongly condemns” the test and calling on other nations to follow suit.

He called the missile a “new escalation of the threat to the United States, our allies and partners, the region, and the world.”

“Global action is required to stop a global threat,” Tillerson wrote. “Any country that hosts North Korean guest workers, provides any economic or military benefits, or fails to fully implement UN Security Council resolutions is aiding and abetting a dangerous regime.”

The US Army, alongside the South Korean military, initiated a counter-response in the region on Wednesday local time, the Army said in a statement.

The exercise involved firing a South Korean-developed Hyunmoo missile into the South’s territorial waters, “countering North Korea’s destabilizing and unlawful actions.”

“The [Republic of Korea]-US Alliance remains committed to peace and prosperity on the Korean Peninsula and throughout the Asia-Pacific,” the Army said.

An announcement on North Korea state TV was reported to claim that North Korea was now “a fully-fledged nuclear power,” and that its missile was “capable of hitting any part of the world.”

The announcer also claimed the country’s missile had reached a height of 2,802 kilometers (1,731 miles) and flew 933 kilometers for 39 minutes.

Check out the full story on Buzzfeed.com.

 

Stars Daniel Dae Kim and Grace Park have departed CBS’ “Hawaii Five-0.” Their characters, Chin Ho Kelly and Kono Kalakaua, will not appear in the upcoming eighth season. The characters’ absence will be referenced in the season premiere.

Sources tell Variety that Park and Kim had been seeking pay equality with stars Alex O’Loughlin and Scott Caan, but were unable to reach satisfactory deals with CBS Television Studios, which produces the series. CBS’s final offer to Kim and Park was believed to have been 10-15% lower than what O’Loughlin and Caan make in salary. O’Laughlin and Caan each have deals that also provide them percentage points on the show’s back end.

“I will never forget meeting Daniel while still writing the pilot and being certain there was no other actor who I’d want to play Chin Ho Kelly,” said executive producer Peter Lenkov. “Needless to say, Daniel has been an instrumental part of the success of ‘Hawaii Five-0’ over the past 7 seasons and it has personally been a privilege to know him. Grace’s presence gave ‘Hawaii Five-0’ a beauty and serenity to each episode. She was the consummate collaborator, helping build her character from day 1. They will always be ohana to us, we will miss them and we wish them both all the best.”

For more details about the story visit variety.com.

Uber’s embattled CEO Travis Kalanick is resigning from the ride-sharing company he helped found in 2009 following a “shareholder revolt” led by some of Uber’s most prominent investors, the New York Times reports.

An Uber spokesperson confirmed to TechCrunch that Kalanick has stepped down.

The report states that five of Uber’s most prominent investors, including Benchmark, wrote a letter titled “Moving Uber Forward,” which recommended that the CEO step aside immediately. After hours of discussion, Kalanick agreed to resign.

“I love Uber more than anything in the world and at this difficult moment in my personal life I have accepted the investors request to step aside so that Uber can go back to building rather than be distracted with another fight,” Kalanick said in a statement given to the Times.

Kalanick will continue to hold a position on Uber’s board of directors, according to a statement from the board given to TechCrunch.

“Travis has always put Uber first. This is a bold decision and a sign of his devotion and love for Uber. By stepping away, he’s taking the time to heal from his personal tragedy while giving the company room to fully embrace this new chapter in Uber’s history. We look forward to continuing to serve with him on the board.”

Kalanick announced just last week that he was taking a leave of absence from the company following the release of a report into Uber’s toxic company culture by former Attorney General Eric Holder.

Kalanick cited a recent family tragedy and internal issues at the company as reasons for the leave, saying in a letter to Uber employees, “…I need to take some time off of the day-to-day to grieve my mother, whom I buried on Friday, to reflect, to work on myself, and to focus on building out a world-class leadership team.”

Following his leave, Kalanick had put day-to-day leadership in the hands of several employees who had reported directly to him. With Kalanick’s resignation, Uber is now missing a CEO, COO, CFO, CMO and a host of other critical high-level positions following months of seemingly endless executive departures.

Today’s move shows that the gravity of recent scandals at the company and their threat to Uber’s core business was weighing heavily on investors’ minds.

Perhaps most damaging were the numerous reports of sexual harassment and discrimination at the company, which led to an external investigation into complaints that eventually resulted in more than 20 employees being fired.

Uber has raised more than $11 billion in funding and left its most recent raise with a reported $70 billion valuation. Though Silicon Valley investors have shown that they will follow a founder’s direction in even the most turbulent times, recent events proved to threaten Uber’s stability, something they could not accept.

Article from Techcrunch.com

The bullfighter Iván Fandiño has died after being gored in a ring in France, becoming the second Spanish matador to be killed in less than 12 months after the death of Víctor Barrio last July.

Entertaining a crowd Aire-sur-l’Adour, southwestern France, on Saturday, Fandiño tripped on his cape and fell to the floor, allowing the bull he was fighting to gore him savagely in his right flank.

Read the full story here.